Month: April 2013

The Politics of Justice Reform in Haiti

Provides a brief review on a recent paper written by Louis-Alexandre Berg outlining the recent history of justice reform in Haiti. In broad terms, the paper shows how what donors have seen as a technical problem (scarcity of personnel, corruption, inefficiency) actually serves an important role for Haiti’s political elite, who have accordingly been reluctant to advance meaningful reform of the justice system.

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Analyzing Intersecting, Concurrent Conflicts: Observations from Yemen

Yemen is currently experiencing a number of intersecting security crises. How might the international community analyze a context such as this, which includes long-standing and more recent conflicts that frequently intersect and overlap? How might such an analysis differentiate between the severity and timeliness of various conflicts, some of which appear acute, while others are perhaps more structural in nature, presenting a long-term threat to stability?

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Reform by Incentives

Agencies, bureaucrats, and people have their interests. They are sometimes moral, and sometimes material. We should not be surprised that security sector reform, or reform writ large, is so difficult to achieve. As such, Labarre asks, why not incentivize reform? Make it materially attractive?

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Rethinking “Capacity Building”

Geoff Burt provides a review of a paper written by Wilfrid Laurier University professor, Yasmine Shamsie, on the management of the Caracol export processing zone, an economic development mega-project which when completed promises to generate thousands of jobs and a boost for Haiti’s economic growth.

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Transitional Justice and SSR: The case of Sierra Leone

Transitional justice measures and security sector reform (SSR) programs share the goal to have accountable security institutions, especially as a state’s security forces are often held responsible for human rights violations that occur during civil conflict or during authoritarian rule. While both can be mutually reinforcing, the sequencing of transitional justice and SSR is crucial.

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