Month: March 2014

Toward Security Sector Decentralization: Liberia’s County Security Councils and Regional Hubs

Toward Security Sector Decentralization: Liberia’s County Security Councils and Regional Hubs By: Ibrahim Al-bakri Nyei [et_pb_text... Article Liberia’s political centralization has only resulted in limited access to basic services in most parts of the country, including justice and security. However, recent efforts at security sector reform in Liberia have entailed a process of decentralizing the national security architecture, involving the establishment of local security councils and regional hubs. This piece provides an overview on security governance in Liberia, and how local councils and hubs are contributing to decentralization in the security sector. The concept of security sector governance broadly...

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Re-Post: Is It Time to Rethink our Approach to Security Sector Reform?

Re-Post: Is It Time to Rethink our Approach to Security Sector Reform? By: Mark Downes [et_pb_text... Article Mark Downes is Assistant Director of the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF) and Head of DCAF’s International Security Sector Advisory Team (ISSAT). Click here to read the full post. Security Sector Reform is increasingly perceived as the answer to the vast array of security challenges that beset post-conflict and fragile communities. It is hyped as the answer to the exit strategy dilemma faced by the international community. It is not the concept of SSR that matters, but the integrated...

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Arctic Patrol Vessels

Arctic Patrol Vessels By: SSR Resource Centre [et_pb_text... Publication Summary A new Simons Foundation paper by Centre for Security Governance Board Member Ernie Regehr focuses on Canada’s Arctic security requirements and its plans to acquire Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS). With a reported price tag of 8.6 billion CAN, including expected maintenance costs of 5.5 billion CAN over a 25 year period, these vessels represent a significant investment for Canada’s security sector. Many commentators have in turn criticized these ships for their insufficient ice breaking and weapon capabilities as well as limited range. In the words of one such critic, the AOPS “can’t...

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Should Crimea join the Russian Federation?

Should Crimea join the Russian Federation? By: David Law [et_pb_text... Article Despite the emotions conjured up by history, language, culture and the dramatic events of the last few weeks, Crimeans would be wise to ponder whether they would really be better off joining Russia. There are a number of arguments that militate strongly against taking this path. First and foremost, despite what the largely government-owned Russian media and the new, self-appointed leaders in Crimean territory have been saying, Crimea’s Russian speakers need not fear the new authority in Kyiv and its supporters. Those that struggled against Victor Yanukovich’s klepto-regime...

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A New Paradigm for Libya

A New Paradigm for Libya By: Abdul Rahman AlAgeli [et_pb_text... Article To understand security sector reform (SSR) and the disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration (DDR) of combatants in Libya, it’s important to think outside the sometimes constrictive box of theoretical frameworks and to instead analyse the issues from a rational and common sense perspective. Thus far, not many people have looked at SSR and DDR in such a holistic and indeed essential fashion. One can usefully look at the Libyan situation as a series of voids either being filled or waiting to be filled, mostly by those who don’t have...

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Drones: Using 21st Century Technology to Hunt Poachers

For the most part, the only unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) – or drones – that catch our attention are the ones that roam the skies of Afghanistan and Pakistan, hunting insurgents and/or terrorists. While these drones sour public opinion around the world, small fleets of drones have been helping developing countries confront major security problems.

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