Month: October 2014

Policing Engendered Security Sector Reform

Policing Engendered Security Sector Reform By: Heather Murphy [et_pb_text... Article Police reform is a primary component of any security sector reform (SSR) effort, especially since police are seen as the central institution for the protection and security of the population in most nations. Often, police are viewed negatively as agents of the state in times of conflict, frequently serving as enforcers or informants and thus creating a barrier of fear and mistrust between the citizen and the state. In post-conflict societies, it is essential to redefine the role of the police and rebuild the structure and citizen accountability mechanisms....

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DDR III and a Potential New Role for Militias in the DRC

Most of the security issues within the DRC are mainly due to internal economic, political, and social issues rather than external factors. Although FLDR is a major threat to the security in the DRC, it is an externally sponsored group that is a product of regional politics; thus dealing with it would not substantially contribute to solving internal security issues. Thus, other Congolese armed groups more domestic in orientation and origin should be examined.

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Where Are Our Girls?

Boko Haram’s April 14 kidnapping of more than 200 schoolgirls from the northeastern town of Chibok has been one of the most provocative developments of its almost five-year insurgency against the Nigerian government. Yet six months later, the Chibok girls remain hostages of one of the most brutal insurgent groups on the African continent. A burning question remains unanswered: What will happen to the Chibok girls?

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Too late to start worrying about the Islamic State in Africa

The spectre of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria casts a long shadow. It’s clearly not just the Middle East that is in trouble; both Britain and the United States have been worried enough to dispatch fighter jets to try and contain the Islamist rebels. Analysts have warned that Africa is particularly vulnerable. The continent’s plethora of existing Islamist groups, coupled with its poor governance track record, make it a relatively ­­easy target.

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On/Off SSR: A Crisis for EU Security Provision

On Sept. 30, the EU mission to support police reform in the DRC formally closed. The second EU mission in the country, EUSEC, which contributes to reforming the defence sector, will maintain a limited presence until mid-2015. The author argues these closures highlight the failure of the EU to put its own SSR approach into practice. On/off SSR of this type will not contribute to genuine reform and undermines EU engagement in the DRC.

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New Developments along Mexico’s Southern Border

Until this summer, very little attention was paid to the 714-mile border that Mexico shares with Guatemala and Belize. But an unprecedented increase in Central American migrant children crossing the US border, primarily in south Texas, changed that. In this article, the authors highlight the latest developments along Mexico’s Southern border.

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Kazakhstan: Conflict in the Making? – Part Two

In the first part of this series on Kazakhstan, the author argued that the country had every chance to rise to the challenge set by its president, namely for the country to become one of the world’s top 30 most developed by 2050 – and this in an atmosphere of ethnic tolerance and cooperation, such as largely prevails in the country today. However, Kazakhstan will have to overcome several challenging moments along the way.

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Kazakhstan: Wildflower Rising from the Steppes! – Part One

The capital of Kazakhstan, Astana is an architectural marvel, a once backwater village that has now become a 21st century urban icon in less than two decades. In the novel The Zahir, author Paulo Coelho, describes Astana “like a wildflower rising from the steppes.” In this first blog of this two part series, the author argues that Coelho’s description can be applied to Kazakhstan as a whole.

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