Month: April 2015

Factors behind South Sudan’s Persistent Insecurity

Although the civil war that began in December 2013 is largely a product of a political/military power struggle, the general insecurity in South Sudan stems from numerous, intertwined factors. All of these factors have to be addressed for South Sudan to find long-lasting and sustainable peace. This backgrounder will briefly examine the major factors responsible for insecurity in South Sudan.

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Gender, Security and SSR in Lebanon

This report is part of a series of publications that explore Lebanese citizens’ perceptions of security institutions and threats. This report focuses specifically on the links between gender and security. It examines “the role of gender in Lebanese security perceptions, Lebanese perceptions of security institutions, as well as gender dynamics within security institutions.” This summary will discuss the most important points of the report in these areas.

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Could New Laws to Fight Terrorism Actually Help Fuel It?

Last week in Australia, 230 suspected jihadists were prevented from flying to the Middle East, highlighting a trend among governments to implement tough new counterterrorism laws. While these laws have a purported purpose of improving national security, there is a risk that punitive measures that widen police and intelligence powers could among other things, prove counterproductive to fighting terrorism by increasing the marginalization of communities.

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Insider Attacks – A Persisting Afghan Threat and Lessons for the Future

As Western forces pull-out of Afghanistan and hand over combat and security responsibility to the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF), a large proportion of the remaining personnel will be working closely with members of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF). Without the benefit of protection measures, such as armed guards and escorts, ISAF members are vulnerable to “insider attacks” from ANSF members.

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