About the Event

Peacekeeping missions are one of the most visible and celebrated activities of the United Nations (UN), with over 125,000 personnel currently serving in 16 missions across 4 continents. The nature and scope of peacekeeping missions have evolved significantly since the inaugural UN Truce Supervision Organization mission was launched in 1948. Today’s peacekeepers do far more than monitor ceasefires and separate warring parties; they are employed to manage conflicts within weak and fragile states and facilitate peacebuilding and development activities. However, the UN’s record in these new complex and multi-dimensional missions is mixed, as seen in Rwanda, South Sudan and the Democratic of Republic of Congo.

The peacekeeping landscape appears ripe for further change. Building upon a seminal review of peacekeeping operations, member states, including Western states, pledged in 2015 to modernize UN peacekeeping and provide an additional 40,000 troops. Innovation has become a buzzword around UN peacekeeping missions, exemplified by the use of new technologies, such as unmanned aerial vehicles, or the increased attention paid to gender issues, marked by the establishment of all-female peacekeeping units.

Poised to enter a new era of peacekeeping, it is important to explore these recent developments and what they mean for broader peacebuilding processes. This will be the central question addressed at the fifth instalment of the Centre for Security Governance’s eSeminar series on “Contemporary Debates on Peacebuilding and Statebuilding”, presented in collaboration with the Balsillie School of International Affairs and Wilfrid Laurier University’s Department of Global Studies. Our distinguished panelists will each give brief introductory remarks, followed by an open Q&A period where participants will be able to engage the panel directly. An edited video of the event is hosted on YouTube and available at the top of this page.

An report of the event, which took place on November 3, 2016 at 12:30pm EST, is available for download below:

Dr. Mark Sedra

Dr. Mark Sedra

Moderator

Dr. Mark Sedra is the Executive Director of the Centre for Security Governance. Mark teaches in the Department of Political Science at the University of Waterloo and is a faculty member of the Balsillie School of International Affairs. Prior to joining the Centre for Security Governance, he was a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) and the leader of CIGI’s Security Sector Governance project. His research on post-conflict state building has taken him to a number of countries and regions, including Afghanistan, Northern Ireland, Sudan, the Middle East and the Balkans. Mark was formerly a research associate at the Bonn International Center for Conversion, and a visiting research fellow at the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom. He served as the 2004-2005 Cadieux Léger Fellow in the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT). Mark has served as a consultant on international security issues to numerous organizations and governments, including the United Nations, DFAIT and the British Department for International Development.
Jane Boulden

Jane Boulden

Panelist

Jane Boulden is a Professor at the Royal Military College of Canada. She is also a Research Fellow at the Queen’s University Centre for International and Defence Policy. From 2004-2014 she held a Canada Research Chair in International Relations and Security Studies. From 2000 until 2004 she was a MacArthur Research Fellow at the Centre for International Studies, University of Oxford. Her books include, Responding to Conflict in Africa, the United Nations and Regional Organizations, (ed.) Palgrave Macmillan 2013; Jane Boulden, Ramesh Thakur, Thomas G. Weiss, eds., The United Nations and Nuclear Orders, United Nations University Press, 2009; Jane Boulden and Thomas G. Weiss, eds., Terrorism and the UN: Before and After September 11th, (Indiana University Press, 2004), Jane Boulden, ed., Dealing with Conflict in Africa: the United Nations and Regional Organizations, (New York: Palgrave, 2003); and Jane Boulden, Peace Enforcement, (Westport, CT: Praeger, 2001).

Arthur Boutellis

Arthur Boutellis

Panelist

Arthur Boutellis is Director of the Brian Urquhart Center for Peace Operations at the International Peace Institute (IPI). Since first joining IPI in 2011, his work has focused on a variety of policy matters related to UN peace operations (peacekeeping and special political missions), including strategic planning, management, force generation, partnerships including with the African Union, peacebuilding, mediation and peace processes, prevention, transnational organized crime, DDR/SSR, protection of civilians, and the politics of UN reform.

In addition to IPI, Arthur has worked with the UN missions in Burundi (BINUB), Chad and the Central African Republic (MINURCAT), Haiti (MINUSTAH), and most recently, Mali (MINUSMA) where he supported the 2014-15 Mali peace negotiations as part of the UN Mediation Team. His prior work with humanitarian NGOs and think tanks focused on the Middle East and Africa.

He has published widely, regularly speaks at conferences and in the media and teaches a graduate-level seminar at Columbia University. He holds a master’s degree in public affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and is a graduate of the Institut d’Etudes Politiques. He is bilingual in French and English, as well as fluent in Spanish.

Tatianna Carayannis

Tatianna Carayannis

Panelist

Tatiana Carayannis is the Deputy Director of the Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum (CPPF), a program of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) aimed at strengthening the analytic capacity of UN peace operations. Tatiana also serves as a research director of the Justice and Security Research Programme at the LSE and also convenes the DRC Affinity Group, a small brain trust of leading Congo scholars. She also directs the SSRC’s China-Africa Knowledge Project. A specialist on the DRC, Tatiana has written widely on political mobilization, rebel governance, and the UN in the Congo, the MLC rebel movement, and UN human rights and development ideas. Earlier, she directed a research and publication program on the intellectual history of the UN at The CUNY Ralph Bunche Institute for International Affairs. In 1998, she served as rapporteur for the UN Secretary-General’s Resource Group on the DRC. She co-edited Making Sense of the Central African Republic (Zed Books, August 2015) and co-authored UN Voices: The Struggle for Development and Social Justice (Indiana University Press, 2005). She is currently working on three new books, The Logic of Public Authority: Justice and Security in Central Africa; Pioneers of Peacekeeping: ONUC 1960-1964; and Authorities in Conflict in the DRC. She holds an M.A. (New York University) and MPhil (The CUNY Graduate Center). Tatiana grew up in the DRC and travels frequently to the region.