Tag: Afghanistan

Theorizing corruption in the Afghan judicial sector

The purpose of this blog is to identify and analyze the dynamics of corruption at its systemic roots that has led to forms of state capture, low pay resulting in petty forms of corruption and issues with training within the Afghan judicial sector. The paper relies on 70 semi-structured interviews conducted predominantly in Kabul with judicial reform and human rights organizations, rights-based and gender empowerment non-governmental organizations and civil society watchdogs.

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The Afghan National Police: A study on corruption and clientelism

This blog identifies the underlying conditions of the Afghan state from the outset of the late 2001 Bonn political arrangement that has resulted in deep-rooted corrupt clientelistic networks within the Afghan government. This has trickled to the majority of the ministries including the Interior Ministry. Corruption is systemic and hard to combat despite police reform. This is due to the nature of four interrelated explanations of corruption that are subsequently covered.

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Did PRTs in Afghanistan Decrease Security for Aid Workers?

In an effort to curtail the insurgency in Afghanistan, the US military and International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) blended military and humanitarian operations, much to the dismay of many within the nongovernmental organization (NGO) community. One of the major debates surrounding this effort concerns the Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) initiative, which several NGOs have faulted for causing “blurred lines” between military and aid activity.

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Insider Attacks – A Persisting Afghan Threat and Lessons for the Future

As Western forces pull-out of Afghanistan and hand over combat and security responsibility to the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF), a large proportion of the remaining personnel will be working closely with members of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF). Without the benefit of protection measures, such as armed guards and escorts, ISAF members are vulnerable to “insider attacks” from ANSF members.

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The Danger of Unfinished Security Sector Reform in Afghanistan

Although it is not entirely clear how Afghanistan’s newly-formed unity government will function on a day-to-day basis, the arrangement is nonetheless considered a political victory. While a political catastrophe has been headed off for now, a stubborn security crisis is worsening by the day and the glow from this historic achievement is likely to wear off soon.

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The Critical Role of the Security Sector in Situations of Displacement: Reflections from the 2013 WANA Forum

This past week, the West Asia-North Africa (WANA) Forum convened in Amman to consider the challenges posed by the “uprooted”, a term which the Forum adopted to refer to the situation of internally displaced persons, refugees and migrants. Interestingly, the security sector remained fundamentally absent from the WANA Forum’s discussions, highlighting the dearth of attention placed on the role played by military, police and border forces in managing displacement and migration.

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A Day Late and Many Advisors Short: The Uncertain Future for Afghan Ministerial Development

This month the U.S. Department of Defense released its latest semi-annual report to Congress on the progress toward security and stability in Afghanistan. This report provides a detailed snapshot of indictors on the overall security, governance, reconstruction, and Afghan National Security Force (ANSF) development efforts by NATO-ISAF and the international community to date.

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ISA Convention: “The Monopoly of Force: The Nexus Between Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) and Security Sector Reform (SSR)”

There are numerous missed opportunities to leverage the complementarity of DDR and SSR, including: establishing a veterans administration to care for former combatants, using DDR practitioners’ knowledge to facilitate the effective procurement of weapons for the security forces and the vetting of candidates, as well as the management of weapons stockpiles.

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Four Elections, Four Months

The failure to secure Afghanistan’s elections (again) only adds to questions about the approach to furthering progress in the country. For the electoral processes in Somaliland, Kenya and Côte d’Ivoire to defy concerns of insecurity and arrest expectations of violence and disorder, no matter their other shortcomings, proves the value of legitimizing elections through voter confidence and a secure environment.

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