Tag: Security Sector Reform

Four Weaknesses of South Sudan’s Military Integration Process

Since the fracturing of the South Sudanese military in December 2013, South Sudan has been embroiled in civil war. As ongoing peace negotiations are likely to contain transitional security arrangements that would contain provisions to integrate non-statutory armed forces into the South Sudanese military, it is important to understand what factors previously compromised the implementation of military integration prior to 2013. This article explores four of these factors.

Read More

Farmer-Herder Clashes Amplify Challenge for Beleaguered Nigerian Security

Nigeria’s new president, Muhammadu Buhari, has made the task of finishing off the Boko Haram insurgency an immediate priority for his administration. Yet, while Nigeria’s security apparatus appears fixated on this group, large swaths of the country’s rural areas continue to experience armed clashes between farming communities and ethnic Fulani herdsmen, posing further challenges for already strained forces.

Read More

Security and insecurity in a police state: Security Sector Reform in the occupied Palestinian territories and the law of unintended consequences

As a wave of protests swept through the Arab world in 2010–11, the relative stability of the occupied Palestinian territories (oPt) largely escaped international attention. In a marked break with the unrest and massive sustained popular mobilizations of the past, no significant opposition emerged to challenge the status quo in the oPt, even though dissatisfaction with the status quo runs high in the territories.

Read More

Programming Tools: Another Way of Keeping External Control of the SSR Process?

In May 2015 the Geneva-based International Security Sector Advisory Team (ISSAT), published a document entitled “Top 10 Programming Tools for Security Sector Reform”. The work explains the methodology and benefits of their favorite ten tools: PESTLES Analysis, RBM, Stakeholder Analysis, Power/Interest Matrix, Conflict Mapping, the CIS Framework, Effects Estimate, SWOT Analysis, Organization Mapping and Gap Analysis.

Read More

Progress in Small Steps: Security against the Odds in Liberia

This case study report analyzes Liberia’s progress in security since 2003, after 14 years of conflict. It discusses progress achieved in personal security since 2003, analyzes the factors that contributed to this progress, examines remaining challenges, and identifies policy lessons. When compared to other factors that are driving the change in security, security sector reform has been a small but significant factor to improving Liberia’s security environment.

Read More

Factors behind South Sudan’s Persistent Insecurity

Although the civil war that began in December 2013 is largely a product of a political/military power struggle, the general insecurity in South Sudan stems from numerous, intertwined factors. All of these factors have to be addressed for South Sudan to find long-lasting and sustainable peace. This backgrounder will briefly examine the major factors responsible for insecurity in South Sudan.

Read More

Gender, Security and SSR in Lebanon

This report is part of a series of publications that explore Lebanese citizens’ perceptions of security institutions and threats. This report focuses specifically on the links between gender and security. It examines “the role of gender in Lebanese security perceptions, Lebanese perceptions of security institutions, as well as gender dynamics within security institutions.” This summary will discuss the most important points of the report in these areas.

Read More

Learning from failure? British and European approaches to security and justice programming

The author argues it is possible to better understand what we can learn from failure and what are ways forward for better, more effective security and justice assistance. He highlights three main elements: 1) the key problems and challenges associated with security governance; 2) what we can learn from failure in the British and European examples; and 3) what we can learn from broader debates about international development and more politically focused approaches.

Read More
Loading