Month: May 2014

Rethinking Tunisian Border Security

Following the Arab Spring uprisings, border security in Tunisia became a major concern. With relatively long borders, including land borders that extend 900 kilometers with Algeria and 459 kilometers with Libya and a stretch of coastline 1,148 kilometers long that borders the Mediterranean Sea, Tunisia faces many border security challenges. What follows is an assessment of Tunisia’s border security challenges and the government’s response.

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Political and Economic Reforms in Burma/Myanmar

Although China dominated much of the discussion at the 2014 ASEAN Summit, the gathering of the Southeast Asian nations in Myanmar provided the host country an opportunity to showcase the progress it has made since the implementation of key political and economic reforms. Despite these efforts, the country’s political system continues to be fragile and uncertainty over the role of its security sector remains.

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Shifting Minefields: Bosnia’s Violent Legacy in the Wake of the Balkan Floods

Bosnia-Herzegovina has suffered tremendously from the recent Balkan floods – unexpected flash flooding, bursting rivers, and landslides have resulted in a state of emergency. Particularly troubling are the 2,000 landslides which have occurred as a result of the floods. As a result of the heavy rainfall, thousands of landslides have dislodged landmines from their carefully mapped locations, compounding the many dangers from the floods.

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Reforming Libya’s Post-Revolution Security Sector: The Militia Problem

Libya’s new government must contend with a rapidly deteriorating security situation – to the East, it faces armed Federalist militia groups that have already shown a strong inclination for blackmail. Along its periphery, Tripoli had shown little capacity to control its porous borders or militia groups involved in the cross-border illicit economy. In this blog post, the author discusses the serious problem of militias in Libya.

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Al-Shabaab’s New Face in Kenya?

Terrorists in Kenya have tended to be sympathetic to al-Shabaab’s ideology but unlikely to have direct ties to the group. However this appears to be changing. A “new, shadowy” Kenyan radical group made up almost exclusively of ethnic Somalis, a group to which the Pangani suicide bombers had belonged, seems to have emerged. Does Al-Shabab have anything to do with this new group? This question will be explored in this article.

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Planning for “What’s Next”: The Annexation Shock and its Impact on SSR in Ukraine

Among the pressing security concerns of the day (Nigeria, Syria, Afghanistan, and the South China Sea stand out most prominently), Ukraine continues to dominate discussions across the North Atlantic. With continuous Russian pressure and Ukraine’s internal problems in its east, what institutional changes might be possible within the Ukrainian government, and within the security apparatus more specifically?

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Sending in the Military: Not a Long-Term Solution to Mexico’s Security Problems

The recent security crisis in Mexico suggests a repetition of past strategies that have been ineffective at reducing crime and violence. Mexico’s experience has shown that deploying the military cannot be a substitute for building police forces that fight crime with the population’s trust and cooperation. Deploying soldiers for tasks they have not been trained to handle in an environment permissive of abuse has only resulted in human rights violations.

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